Monday, July 28, 2014

Time to Get Cracking

I'm pinching New Gippsland Seeds facebook post here but it's good advice and I'm sure they won't mind.

You'd better get cracking though, you're running out of time if you want to plant any of these bare rooted.




Cheers

Stewart

Sunday, July 27, 2014

My Globe Artichoke.

Roses


I received a phone call on Friday to let me know that two roses* I'd ordered a while ago had arrived and I could pick them up when I was ready.

I was keen to pick them up so I pinched my wife's car this morning (Sunday) and made a bee line for the nursery.

While I was waiting to be served I was having a good look around when I spied a very over grown punnet of Globe Artichoke.

  'Powis Castle


It's been in the back of my mind to grow some more Globe Artichokes.

So I bought them, the roses, a packet of seeds, some potash, a wormwood  'Powis Castle' and a punnet of lobelia.

 I had Globe Artichoke years ago but lost them in the drought when I was too crook to care for them. Before that though they grew well.



Planting


Being a perennial I gave the soil a good dose of Witch's Brew.

About twenty liters over a two meter by half a meter row.

Turned it into the soil and planted my Globe Artichoke.


Sixty centimeters apart was the recommended plant spacing on the label but seeing as it is only a single row I planted mine about forty centimeters apart.

 Mulch


  A  little on the root bound side of things but I teased the roots out a little so I hope this will take care of any root balling.

Gave them a good watering and I'll give them a good mulch of straw when I get a chance on Tuesday.

Cheers and happy gardening,

Stewart.

*The two roses I ordered were 'Cabana' and 'Remember Me'.














Calling Toowoomba Gardeners

A little Toowoomba centric but here goes,



Saturday, July 26, 2014

B is for Borage

Back in the good old days when I had my Garden Maintenance business a customer introduced me to the wonders of borage.

So I'll plant some.

I might be a little early so I'm only planting two, fifty miller-meter tube pots to see if they'll germinate and if they do I'll plant a heap more.

While it has many uses I'll mainly be using it for it's bee attracting flowers.

 You can never have too many bee attracting flowers as far as I can tell.

Though, if I ever need regulation of metabolism and the hormonal system, or a remedy for PMS and menopause symptoms then I'll be prepared.

Other benefits of having Borage in the garden include, as a companion plant which is said to protect or nurse legumes, spinach, brassicas, and even strawberries. It is also said to be a good companion plant to tomatoes.


Seeds about the size of a match head and they're easy to plant.

You can find out more about Borage here at Rangeview Seeds.

Cheers

Stewart.

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Growing carrots in a pot.

While I was up at the Qld Gardening Expo my Mum suggested to me that I do a few stories on growing veggies in pots.

So here's the first of many as there's heaps of veggies that you can grow in pots.

I need to find a good potting mix though.

So far most mixes I've used I've found wanting in a few departments.

Anyway, this is about as easy as growing veggies gets, so why not have a go?



Cheers and happy growing veggies in pots

Stewart

Monday, July 21, 2014

I don't know why I didn't think of it sooner!

Sooner 


I don't know why I didn't think of it sooner!   

I've been putting wire cages around plants here forever to keep possums from eating my seedlings and at the same time I've been trying to work out a way to stop the white cabbage moth from laying it's eggs on my cabbages as demonstrated by the cabbage below.  

I've known about those fancy exclusion nets and such but I only grow one or two cabbage at a time.
Rarely in a row, and it seemed like a lot of effort for one or two cabbage.  

Wire Cages


Then it occurred to me, just leave the wire cages I'm using to keep the possum away over the cabbage and the moth can't get to the plant, so simple.

So simple I don't know why I haven't thought of it before.

For now I have the bigger chicken wire and the smaller bird wire covering one cabbage each.

Mainly to see if the moth can be bothered to fly through the larger chicken wire spacing.

No Support


 The cages don't need any extra support and are free standing. No need for staking or making frames up.

If it works though, I'll need to increase the overall size of my cages to account for the extra size of growth as my current cages are for covering seedlings only.
Here's the evil culprit chowing down on my broccoli.




Cheers, lets see how it goes

Stewart.